Tag: emergency-department

Closing the Provider-Psych Patient Information Gap

August 26th, 2013
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In the emergency department, psychiatric patients can be particularly challenging. Evaluation in the ED is primarily based on history from many different sources–police, family, EMS, many times second hand or on a written report or petition. Often, family does not accompany the patient to the ED. Patients can be unreliable, intoxicated or just plain unable […]

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Posted in Quality Efficiency Utilization

More Medicine, Less Art – Reducing Variation in Healthcare Costs

August 13th, 2013
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After eating at my favorite restaurant last week, I started to think why I enjoyed it so much. I have been eating at the same place regularly for years, but never stopped to think about what makes it special. After thinking about it for a bit, I came up with one word: consistency. I know […]

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Posted in Quality Efficiency Utilization

A Week of Tragedy and Wonders: Boston, Waco, and Times Like This

April 25th, 2013
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Think way back to ten days ago. Kim Jong Un’s bizarre anti-US saber rattling: nuke tipped missiles aimed at a Colorado Springs (located squarely in the heart of Texas). On April 15 he promised hellfire to commemorate his grandfather, the patriarch of his dynasty. Then, at 3pm that Monday, came two near-simultaneous explosions at an […]

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Posted in Life in the ER

Amid Change, Physicians are Faced With a Choice

April 16th, 2013
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Amid massive change in our healthcare delivery systems and seismic shifts in many regional markets, physicians are increasingly being faced with a simple choice: be acquired or become employed as part of a large healthcare system, or stay independent while offering a compelling service that hospitals and health systems value.  The changes occurring in our […]

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Posted in Future of Healthcare, Hospital Partnership

Leadership in the ED: Being a Floor General for Your Team

March 20th, 2012
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In sports, the most successful athletes are not necessarily those that have had the best individual statistics, but are those that have managed to make their teammates better around them: Magic Johnson, Isaiah Thomas, or to use a hot new name – Jeremy Lin.  These athletes epitomize selfless leadership on the court. While their own […]

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Posted in Life in the ER

America’s Healthcare System Needs a Social Contract

March 15th, 2012
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As a citizen it’s easy to clamor for rights. It’s much harder to live up to our responsibilities. And so it is in health care. As citizens we have implicitly agreed to abide by a social contract, which means a person’s moral and political obligations are dependent on an agreement among them to form the […]

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Posted in Future of Healthcare

Sometimes the Best Emergency Medicine is No Medicine at All

February 3rd, 2012
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I was recently reminded by a patient experience that the best medicine sometimes is no medicine at all. I cared for a young woman who had been seen the last few nights complaining of shortness of breath. When it was obvious that she had normal breath sounds, no wheezing and normal oxygen level I started […]

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Posted in Quality Efficiency Utilization

Leading from the Front in a New Emergency Department

January 31st, 2012
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I recently spent a week working clinically at our new hospital partner, Bristol Hospital, in Connecticut. I worked along many other experienced, seasoned physicians and leaders. In fact, nearly all of our group’s top leadership and senior partners have worked clinical shifts in the Emergency Department there in recent weeks. And “leading from the front,” so to […]

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Posted in Leadership

After 20 Years in Emergency Medicine, The Worries and Tools I Take to a New ER

January 24th, 2012
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When I completed my training nearly 20 years ago, I always wondered what type of emergency department I would work in. Two decades later I can say I’ve worked in a lot of different emergency departments, seven of them to be specific. They range from bustling suburban hospitals to small rural facilities to busy trauma […]

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Posted in Life in the ER, Quality Efficiency Utilization

It’s Mandatory Flu Shot Season Again!

October 7th, 2011
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It’s flu season again, which means it’s flu shot season again. As it has last year, Shady Grove Adventist Hospital mandated that all employees get vaccinated, and while most people are compliant, the policy generates a lot of talk. The usual stuff: “I don’t think it really works,” and “I always get sicker from the […]

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Posted in Life in the ER