Life in the ER

As Go Your Relationships, So Goes Your Resiliency

July 11th, 2017
by:

We hear a lot about how your work can affect your personal relationships, usually for the worse. In fact, I wrote about how cynicism at work can negatively affect your relationships at home in a recent column. This is a well-worn topic in emergency medicine, and there are a lot of strategies to deal with it. Go […]

read article

Posted in For Residents, Life in the ER

The Exact Moment When I Realized I Needed To Change

April 11th, 2017
by:

A fellow resident and I were working a busy Monday shift, and I was walking by the room where he was seeing a patient when I heard him say, “Let me step out for a moment.” He came out, quickly closed the curtain, flexed his fists, sucked in some air, held it, and finally blew […]

read article

Posted in For Residents, Life in the ER

Meet Dr. Deepika Singh, a USACS Traveling “Firefighter” and a Mom

March 16th, 2017
by:

It’s the most counter-intuitive thing you could possibly expect to hear from a physician whose job is to travel, but it’s true: Dr. Deepika Singh spends more time with her family, and more quality time, than when she worked locally at only one site. Now an Assistant Medical Director with US Acute Care Solutions (USACS), […]

read article

Posted in For Residents, Life in the ER

Answering the Call at Summa Health’s Residency Program

March 2nd, 2017
by:

As emergency medicine physicians, we have more or less self-selected careers in which we “answer the call” when we are needed. Even so, this was not the kind of call I was expecting while on winter vacation with my family and friends. In the days just after Christmas this past December, I was in Hocking Hills […]

read article

Posted in Future of Healthcare, Hospital Partnership, Life in the ER

Checking Your Cognitive Biases in the ER

February 9th, 2017
by:

Emergency clinicians are faced with a challenging task. During a busy shift, there can be significant pressure to evaluate and treat patients quickly, without giving each case the care it warrants. Thus, physicians often categorize patients early into a specific diagnostic pathway. At some point, however, with each evaluation, we must pause to assess the […]

read article

Posted in Life in the ER, Quality Efficiency Utilization

Physician Burnout Challenges Our Assumptions

December 7th, 2016
by:

I probably set a record for the earliest a physician ever burned out: less than a year after earning my MD. Some may not call it burnout; it could just as well be called “internship.” I call it burnout because beyond the exhaustion and can’t-take-it-anymore, there was a gnawing sense that something fundamental was missing […]

read article

Posted in Future of Healthcare, Life in the ER

The Worst Call to Hear

November 15th, 2016
by:

“8-month old cardiac arrest. ETA 10 minutes.” Of all the cases we see, a pediatric SIDS death is without question the most difficult to bear. I recently cared for a child who a few hours earlier was a happy and playful infant and now arrived in cardiac arrest, pale and lifeless. Despite our usual resuscitative […]

read article

Posted in General, Life in the ER

The Challenge and the Opportunity of ONE USACS

September 22nd, 2016
by:

When I began my career some 25 years ago, my measure of success was pretty simple: take better care of my patients. The average emergency medicine clinician will treat 75,000 patients over a 25-year career. That’s a staggering number of lives to touch. At some point early in my career, I realized there were different […]

read article

Posted in Future of Healthcare, Leadership, Life in the ER

Medicine and Meaning: Thoughts On Change

November 23rd, 2015
by:

Ever notice how quickly things can change in the ED? One minute things seem to be well under control, the next minute several alarms are going off, three nurses are simultaneously asking for you, and there are no inpatient beds available. How’d that happen so quickly? In emergency medicine, we are experts in change – […]

read article

Posted in For Residents, Future of Healthcare, Life in the ER

Code Black and the Changing Culture of Emergency Medicine

September 24th, 2015
by:

“The romance isn’t gone. But it’s definitely going.” That was the verdict from Dr. Patsy McNeil, MEP Health’s Director of Patient Satisfaction, as we discussed the documentary film Code Black at a recent Leadership Academy meeting. The film chronicles a handful of emergency medicine residents training at one of the busiest emergency departments in the […]

read article

Posted in For Residents, Future of Healthcare, Life in the ER